Know before you go!

In addition to the Alpine Responsibility Code, here are some additional tips to keep you safe and enjoy your day on the slopes:

WEATHER

  • Plan ahead for variations in weather. Dress appropriately, and have properly tuned gear. Warmth and visibility are key safety components.
  • UV rays are reflected from the snow surface. Always wear sunscreen, and goggles or sunglasses, even on cloudy days.
  • Cold temperatures increase the likelihood of frostbite. Dress warm, bring extra layers and keep an eye on exposed skin. Go inside immediately if skin begins to turn white.
  • Take note of the conditions. When the snow surface is hard and fast, it is easy to ski/ride at high speed, increasing the risk for serious injury if you fall and slide.  Be aware of changing snow surface conditions.

Be aware of your surroundings

  • Be mindful of where you stop on the hill, for your safety and the safety of other skiers and snowboarders. When resting, move over to the side of the run. Never stop under a roller, jump, cat track, or on a blind corner, as uphill skiers will not be able to see you.
  • Always be aware of other skiers and snowboarders. Look uphill before you commence downhill, and yield to other skiers and snowboarders.

Ski with a buddy

  • Identify meeting points with your group in case you become separated. All group members should know where to meet should separation occur.
  • Carry a whistle and be particularly cautious when skiing/riding in the trees. Tree wells are a real risk.

Helmets

It is highly recommended to wear a helmet while downhill skiing and riding. Skiers and snowboarders are encouraged to educate themselves on the benefits and limitations of helmet usage.  See more on snow sports helmets. 

Keep hydrated and carry a snack with you to keep you fueled

Don’t over do it

Be aware of fatigue, many visitors are on vacation and might not be conditioned to ski/board long days. Warm up in the morning and stretch it out, then tone it down in the afternoon.

Snowcats and snowmobiles

... may be encountered during operating hours.
Give these vehicles plenty of space.

Learn about safety, preparation and helmets

Tree Wells

Natural hazards such as tree wells occur within and outside the ski area boundary. A tree well is a hole or depression that forms around the base of a tree while snow accumulates. A tree well incident occurs when a person falls, head first, into an area of deep snow around the base of a tree and becomes immobilized.

The more the person struggles the more entrapped in the snow they become. The risks of a tree well accident or fatality can be reduced by following these basic practices:

  • Always ski or ride with a partner.
  • Keep your partner in sight and stay in visual contact so they can see you if you fall.
  • Carry a whistle and stay in voice contact with your partner.
  • Stay close enough to your partner to pull or dig each other out.

For more on tree well safety education, visit www.deepsnowsafety.org